ASQ - Team and Workplace Excellence Forum

Issue Highlight — A Sign Of Hope
- Peter Block addresses the importance for corporations to work in the public interest as well as the interest of shareholders, building strong communities and promoting social equity.

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Online Edition - November/December 2000

 In This Issue...
Tackling Leadership
Generation X And The Baby Boomers At Work
Heeding The Call
A Sticky Situation: Creating Innovative Climates

Motivation Made Easy


 Features...
Peter Block Column
Views for a Change
Pageturners
Heard on the Street


Return to NFC Index


    Pageturners        Book Reviews with a Twist



Networlding: Building Relationships and Opportunities for Success
by Melissa Giovagnoli and Jocelyn Carter-Miller

                                                                                
****
  Add "networlding" to your lexicon or buzzword list. The authors describe networlding as a "fundamental new skill" needed for success by everyone in every industry or nonprofit organization, at any stage of his/her career who is interested in advancing. Networlding describes the process by which the lead character-you-identify your primary circle; 10 influencers with whom you have an ongoing exchange from the networlding support exchange model. When this circle is identified, nurtured and recreated from time to time, reaching anyone or any goal is possible.

Helpful features: "Networld Speak" glossary, a 16-item reference list. Web sites are          also listed.

Important concept and challenging chapter: Step Seven describes relationships as          dynamic rather than static, and needing continuous monitoring, assessment and          reformulation.

Favorite quote: "The key is to believe that anything is possible when you start exploring         new relationships. Repeat this as your mantra before you go to sleep each night."

Reviewed by Ann M. Dickson, Ed.D., Education Manager and Business Process Analyst, American Power Conversion, Inc., W. Kingston, RI.

A Second Perspective From Another Reviewer:

                                                                                
***
  How is "networlding" different from "networking?" Most people are familiar with the term networking and have used it to various degrees throughout their careers. But the authors describe "networlding" as a process of developing long-term relationships and opportunities through a powerful support exchange model to achieve life-long personal and professional fulfillment. Networlding builds mutually beneficial relationships, as opposed to strictly using others to get what you need to advance your own career.

  At first glance this book appears to rehash common sense items for developing relationships in business. However, once you get past the first few chapters it turns out to be a reasonably good read. After the authors define the rules to follow when networlding, they define a seven-step methodology to establish your own networlding technique, and they provide many helpful, real-life examples. A variety of activities, such as self-examination questions, are also provided as additional aids. This approach is valuable for anyone interested in establishing his/her own networld.

Favorite chapter: Chapter Four, Step Two: "Make connections for your primary circle,         "provides some excellent ideas and exercises to help a person build a networlding         primary circle. This includes a means of assessing the values that align most         closely with your own.

Structural analysis: This book is sequentially written so each new chapter builds upon         the previous one. It would be difficult to read one chapter and skip ahead to another.

Reviewed by Michael J. Lane, Senior Quality Engineer, GE Harris Harmon, Blue Springs, MO.

"Networlding: Building Relationships and Opportunities for Success." Melissa Giovagnoli and Jocelyn Carter-Miller, 2000, Josey-Bass, San Francisco, CA ISBN 0-7879-4819-5, 216 pages.

Book Ratings:

*****
= Pick it up today
  **** = Overnight it
    
*** = Snail mail it
      
** = At a library?
        * = Never mind


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