March 1996


Quality, Innovation, and Spontaneous Democracy

by Joiner, Brian L.

Attention to latent needs, creation of attractive new products, innovation, and spontaneous initiatives are keys to the ongoing quality revolution. In the first two stages of the quality revolution, inspection and process improvement had been...


Teamwork Brings Breakthrough Improvements in Quality and Climate

by Crom, Steven; France, Herbert

Scrap reduction at one U.K. company depended on cultural change, a problem-solving approach to process improvement, and teamwork. Prior to this initiative, the company's culture was traditionally hierarchical and based on fear. As a first step in...


Making the Big U-Turn

by National Performance Review staff

Listening to customers is part of the revolution in how the U.S. government does business. This reinventing of government has been overseen by the National Performance Review, which in 1995 published the customer service standards of 214 federal...


How to Prevent Teams from Failing

by Beck, John D. W.; Yeager, Neil M.

Successful teamwork relies on the individual responsibilities of each team member and onthe group dynamics of the team itself. The team leader facilitates success by judicious use of leadership styles found in The Leader's Window, as team development...


Xerox 2000: From Survival to Opportunity

by Leo, Richard J.

At Xerox, a new Management Model and a Managing for Results process are helping to transform its Leadership Through Quality program into the Xerox 2000 Leadership Through Quality program. The updated initiative integrates the organization's many...


How to Get Nonbelievers to Participate in Teams

by Jaycox, Michael

If there are associates who resist joining teams, managers and team leaders should find out how to counter such resistance. For associates with outside commitments, leaders may reschedule meetings or let the associates be interim members of a team....


What Benchmarking Books Don't Tell You

by Lincoln, Sarah; Price, Art

Benchmarking teams should consider the following tips. First, decrease the usual nine to 12 months required for a benchmarking study by: having team members contribute at least 20% of their time; using expert consultants for parts of the study; and...



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