2020

SEEN&HEARD

A BAD RAP

In response to “Statistics Spotlight: Different Kinds of Wrong” (December 2019, pp. 74–75): The author’s statement, “We should not be evaluating the merits of an approach by how it performs when it is used incorrectly” hits the nail right on. Statistical tools and, more importantly, statistical thinking, often is given a bad rap because of the incorrect choice of the statistical method and plain ignorance of the fundamental assumptions behind the tools.

Alexander T.C. Lau, Whitby, ON


FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

I really enjoyed the article “Dial Down” (November 2019, pp. 34–39). I’ve been advocating for years that all quality management system nonconformities should be created equal, and the use of just major and minor nonconformities doesn’t go far enough to help the organization prioritize its work. There must be a risk element assigned so high-risk items are addressed immediately and fully, and low-risk items are corrected and contained.

Mark Seay, Palo Alto, CA


INTEGRATE LEAN AND ISO

In response to “Try This Today: Enhancing Value” (June 2019, p. 56): It is so useful to compare International Organization for Standardization requirements with lean tools and practices.

Rafael Mejia, Tegucigalpa, Honduras


The Reaction Gauge

This month’s question

According to LinkedIn’s 2020 “Emerging Jobs Report,” as automation increases, so will the demand for soft skills. More and more, employers are looking for people with outstanding critical thinking, emotional intelligence, decision making, creativity and flexibility skills.

Join the discussion on myASQ at my.asq.org, or on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/company/asq.


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