Changing to Compete: American Industry's Challenge

Article

Huston, Jay T.   (1989, ASQC)   Barber Consulting Resources, Inc., Muncie, IN

Annual Quality Congress, Toronto, Ontario, Canada    Vol. 43    No. 0
QICID: 3546    May 1989    pp. 74-77
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Article Abstract

This paper is the result of a doctoral research project that studied a large automotive division of a fortune 200 corporation as the factory attempted a major transition from a traditional factory to a factory of the future. This transition entailed establishing a focused factory dedicated exclusively to one product line and incorporating broad changes in manufacturing equipment/technology, manufacturing processes, and organizational culture. These cultural changes involved application of Dr. Edwards Deming's 14 points.

The organization felt the pressure for this colossal change due to reductions in their market share largely due to Japanese competition. The major problem identified was poor quality in product and processes resulting in waste and inflated cost.

This research was a qualitative study using a variation of the case study method. Data was obtained over a year primarily through interviews from six informants representing various occupations within and outside the new factory.

The objectives of the study were to investigate and describe the organization's transition to their version of the factory of the future. The emphasis was on detailing the successes and problems encountered and how the various groups of impacted employees reacted to the broad technical and cultural changes.

Keywords

Case study,Automobile industry,Deming, W. Edwards,Deming's 14 points


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