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Open Access

271. Does Assessment Automatically Lead to Improvement?

by John Dew

Educators who study the quality sciences quickly encounter the concept of the Deming Cycle, created by W. Edwards Deming, as adapted to education: plan, do, study, act. The quality discipline teaches you how to properly collect and analyze data, and organize it to create and implement improvements, as well as address systemic issues within organizations that are vital for quality control and quality improvement. Proper analysis of data includes the understanding of common causes and special causes of variation in data.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief

272. 21st Century Learning through Continuous Improvement at the Agora School District

by Joyce de Vries; Rien Spies

This video describes the efforts by the Agora School District in the Netherlands to implement 21st Century learning through continuous improvement. Student-focused learning, such as students becoming independent learners, students leading conferences with parents and professional learning communities for teachers are shown.

  • Filetype: mp4
  • Publish date: 2011-11
Open Access

273. Effective Formative Assessment: Common Instructional Checks

by Mark Keen

In many classrooms in the United States, a vicious cycle occurs daily that goes like this: Students are presented material and tested on that material, and then are presented new material and tested on the new material. And the cycle continues. Students soon learn how to “play school,” meaning to study for short-term memory results, take the test, drop that material from the mind and repeat the same mental process for the new material. Thus, they get good grades but do not really learn. Given this background and our school district’s mission to “provide meaningful and engaging work in the pursuit of profound learning” (“profound” meaning learned in one situation and able to be applied in a different situation), we set off to develop a process to overcome the practice of “playing school” and truly pursue profound learning. To begin, the leadership design team, made up of the district’s principals and central office administrators, set out to develop a process that addressed t

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

274. LEADing Your School to a Quality Future

by Amanda Hankel

When it comes to implementing quality and continuous improvement in K-12 schools, leadership is essential. That was the message in a recent presentation at the National Quality in Education Conference (NQEC) on building a quality culture in your school. According to Tami Miller, one of the presenters and leadership development coordinator for the Greenville Chamber of Commerce in Greenville, SC, leadership is often the missing component in a school’s implementation of quality. Miller is a former school teacher who has spent the last four years of her career managing the Greenville Chamber of Commerce’s Center for Excellence, which provides professional development to area schools on the fundamentals of quality and continuous improvement. “We know leadership is a missing factor for a lot of schools,” Miller said. “If the leadership is not solid, the implementation will only go so far.” Brenda Byrd, principal at Bethel Elementary School in Greenville, SC, for six years, presented w

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

275. Accountability Is Key

by Amanda Hankel

In this issue of the Primary and Secondary Education Brief, one of the interviews I conducted was with Lee Jenkins, an educational consultant and owner of LtoJ Consulting. After speaking with Jenkins, I felt the topic of our conversation highlighted perfectly the continual theme I found throughout this issue focused on facilitating instructional improvement with quality models—more specifically, accountability. Who is accountable for ensuring students receive a quality education, that students have a quality learning environment, and that the teachers educating our students are “quality”? It’s not as cut-and-dry as it seems, and it may be behind some of today’s struggles in quality in education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

276. Steps for Success

by Amanda Hankel

The concept of achieving quality, not quantity, in education, and achieving high success rates with high standards has been the basis of Lee Jenkins’ consult work for the past 10 years. In a recent presentation at the 2011 National Quality Education Conference, Jenkins outlined 12 key steps to implementing quality education. But when asked about the key takeaways from the presentation, Jenkins singled out a few steps that he said are crucial in building the foundation of quality education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

277. At Westfield Washington Schools, Summer R.O.C.K.S.

by Cindy Keever, Dave Mundy

The Summer Reviewing Online Content K-8 Standards (R.O.C.K.S.) program at Westfield Washington Schools helps students retain what they’ve learned from year to year during the summer break.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

278. The Observation Tower: Not Invented Here: Tales From the Dark Side of Innovation

QED News-Spring 2011

by Marianne Di Pierro;

An editorial by Dr. Marianne Di Pierro. Published as the "Observation Tower" editorial in the ASQ Education Division's fall issue of its newsletter, "QED News".

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • Education Division News
Open Access

279. Workforce Development Brief (2011-10)

October 2011

by Deborah Hopen;

The Workforce Development Brief (October 2011), published by the ASQ Education Division. It includes the following authors and the titles of their articles: Practice Makes Real Improvement by James Rooney; Workforce Development and Technology by Tom Berstene; Checklists: The Antidote to Complexity by David Saunders; Intrinsic Motivation by Christine Robinson; Engaging Employees in the Learning Organization; Workforce Development Network by Adina Suciu

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • Workforce Development Brief
Open Access

280. Workforce Development Committee Expands Offerings

by Tom Berstene

Workforce Development Committee Article

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • QED News
Open Access

281. Fab Labs: Re-envisioning Innovation and “Entrepreneering”

by Silvia Tiala

Can Fab Labs provide the impetus for systemic change in education and entrepreneurial environments? Fab Labs, small-scale workshops using off-the-shelf, industrial-grade technologies, are being used to bring prototyping capabilities to underserved communities around the world. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology uses Fab Labs and information technologies to enable individuals to define problems, prototype solutions, and encourage the start of local micro businesses (Lassiter, 2009). The Fab Lab concept may reflect a new manufacturing paradigm where individual “entrepreneers” (individuals who perform both engineering and entrepreneurial tasks) define problems, create solutions, and market products. A community workspace is created that serves as an incubator for research, creative endeavors, and business incubation. The Fab Lab removes barriers such as start-up funding, access to equipment, and access to expertise, thus encouraging systemic change to educational and entrepreneurial env

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

282. Innovating for the Future

by Amanda Hankel

This month, the world lost one of its greatest innovators—Steve Jobs, cofounder of Apple Inc. When thinking of Jobs, you probably think of how products such as the iPod, iPhone, iPad and iMac have revolutionized the consumer technology space. But these innovations also made a tremendous impact on higher education, as well. This article discusses content in the October 2011 issue of Higher Education Brief that highlights the importance of innovation in higher education and how the application of new ideas and new technologies remain paramount concerns for all educators interested in moving past the status quo and exploring new possibilities. How did Jobs achieve the success he did as an innovator in education, and how can we use what we’ve learned from him to continue to innovate and improve quality in education in the future?

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

283. Not Invented Here: Tales From the Dark Side of Innovation

by Marianne Di Pierro

Pioneering spirits in higher education are rare. Sometimes, self-interest and political affiliations play a role in the abandonment of innovative ideas and innovative people: a venture that is risky may hold opportunities for failure and the wrong political alliances can spell doom, and so there is a perceived need to establish distance. The “not invented here” syndrome results in a certain myopic view that encapsulates individuals “inside” of the box, stifling innovation and precipitating the departure of innovators who cannot get to first base because of institutional or organizational gatekeepers. This article discusses the importance of being open to thinking differently—and the potential consequences if an organization is reluctant to do so.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-10
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief

284. QED News: Fall 2011

by Education Division

The fall 2011 issue of the Education Division Newsletter..

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • QED News; Vol. 16; Issue 3
Open Access

285. National Quality Education Conference: A Great Return on Investment!

by J. Jay Marino

National Quality Education Conference Article

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • NQEC
Open Access

286. When Students and Teachers Take Responsibility for Learning

by Karen Chambers

Continuous improvement is an idea that Sue Cleveland Elementary (SCE) has cultivated and embedded into the academic and learning climate of the school. As we began to move toward a systems-based approach, the leadership team realized that we could quickly make progress toward achieving our yearly goals only if our colleagues were willing and ready to think differently about our challenges.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

287. Managing Processes Instead of Having Them Manage Us

by JoAnn Sternke, Mark Hansen

The Pewaukee School District, located near Milwaukee, WI, has been on a quality journey for over 20 years. The school district has successfully employed a strategic planning process to guide its direction since 1992. However, it was in 2006 the district began using the Baldrige criteria, a comprehensive framework with seven distinct categories focusing on achieving performance excellence. While we have reaped many benefits from our commitment to using the Baldrige criteria, the most easily overlooked benefit is that we now have a better understanding of how we do our work. This article focuses on how we accomplish that work. In the Pewaukee School District, we call this “process management.”

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

288. The ADDIE Model: Designing, Evaluating Instructional Coach Effectiveness

by Shelby Danks

The era of accountability throughout the last decade has brought with it a demand for increased capabilities in today’s educators. The elevated need for teachers to engage in the practices of effective instructional design, quality lesson delivery using research-based strategies, and data-enhanced reflection of student results has begun a flurry of interest in a form of professional development known as “instructional coaching.” Recent literature and conversations have demonstrated great strides in identifying the proper role of the instructional coach, as well as key practices coaches can use to support the work of their campuses. Very little information, however, has surfaced in the public education community that describes specific, systematic processes that coaches can use to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of their support. Using the Analysis-Design-Develop-Implement-Evaluate (ADDIE) Model of instructional design, the instructional coach can effectively demonstrate a proper ret

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

289. New Problems Require New Solutions

by Betty Ziskovsky

Unprecedented financial and performance mandate challenges face today’s educators. We have ample proof that an outcome-based management approach hasn’t worked. NAEP scores have been flatlined for years. Dropout rates continue to hover at or above 30%+. Public support for continually increasing education funding has waned. Legislative funding is dwindling and unstable. But costs continue to rise. It is time we embraced a more effective management model, that of Process Improvement and Management. The only way our schools and districts are going to be able to preserve or attain Academic Excellence is by first focusing on becoming institutions of Operational Excellence.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

290. Editorial: Taking Ownership

by Amanda Hankel

I was reminded of the importance of taking ownership in the processes we follow as I worked on the content for this issue of Primary & Secondary Education Brief, with its focus on “Education Reform on Systems and Process Management.” Having standard systems and processes in place is crucial in any school. The ability to follow proven guidelines that have worked for others in the past lays the groundwork for quality. Still, it’s important to take these established processes and adapt them to make them work for you.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-09
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief

291. NQEC Flyer

by NQEC Program Chair;

National Quality Education Conference Flyer

  • Filetype: pdf
Open Access

292. Development and Continuous Improvement of K-12 Outreach Programs in STEM ppt

Pre-Conference Workshop for the ASQ Advancing the STEM Agenda Conference

by Plotkowski, Paul D

Presentation slides from the pre-conference workshop, Development and Continuous Improvement of K-12 Outreach Programs in STEM by Dr. Paul Plotkowski, Dean of the Padnos College of Engineering and Computing, Grand Valley State University (MI). This workshop engaged participants in the essential elements of developing, sustaining, and continuously improving K-12 Outreach Programs in STEM.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-08
  • ASQ Education Division
Open Access

293. Developing Effective Entry and Socialization Programs to Improve Retention of STEM Students

by Chris Plouff

As the demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent continues to increase and outpace the supply of graduates, it becomes increasingly more important for an organization to effectively recruit and retain STEM talent. Strategies for recruiting, orienting and socializing STEM graduates to the workplace are varied, but one that has been shown to be particularly effective is internship or cooperative (co-op) education programs through a college or university.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-08
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

294. Luncheon Keynote at the 2011 ASQ Advancing the STEM Agenda Conference ppt

Pre-Conference Workshop for 2011 ASQ Advancing the STEM Agenda

by Keith T. Miller

Presentation Slides for the Luncheon Keynote, STEM : An Entrepreneurial Approach by Dr. Keith T. Miller at the 2011 Advancing the STEM Agenda Conference.

There is no greater responsibility than to prepare the next generation of students to be leaders in the future of our society. It is up to the current generation of leaders and educators to set priorities and to establish a new precedent. Advances in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics will drive our social and economic future.

Future generations that are well versed in these areas will have a disproportionate effect on the direction of initiatives and developments throughout society. Being prepared in these areas starts with attitude. Failure is more often than not one key to success. One STEM student must be developed at a time. This takes perseverance, creativity and an entrepreneurial approach. The presentation will discuss examples of entrepreneurial attitudes and initiatives that can stimul

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-07
  • STEM Conference Proceedings
Open Access

295. STEM from a Job Churning Perspective ppt

Pre-Conference Workshop for 2011 ASQ Advancing the STEM Agenda

by Fernando F. Padro

Presentation Slides from the pre-conference workshop,STEM from a Job Churning Perspective: Professions Deemed critical for the Country's Future Well-Being presented at the Education Division's 2011 Advancing the STEM Agenda Conference.

The workshop is a discussion of STEM from the backdrop of job churning, particularly job flow as seen in imployment and wage data.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-07
  • STEM Conference Proceedings

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