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251. Leading the Way

by Amanda Hankel

Like schools in most states, Dunlap Community Unit District 323 in Peoria, IL has moved to embrace the Common Core State Standards, which focus on teaching higher-ordered thinking skills—such as synthesis, analysis, evaluation, innovation and creativity, said Jay Marino, the district's superintendent who is also an international consultant on continuous improvement and K-12 Systems Chair for the ASQ Education Division. As the Dunlap school district becomes more rigorous in its focus on embracing 21st century learning standards, it has increased its focus on the areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) because the two go hand-in-hand. To do this, the district has adopted courses from Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a provider of STEM education curricular programs used in middle and high schools across the United States.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

252. Increasing Sustainability of STEM Intervention Programs Through Evaluation

by Casey E. George-Jackson and Blanca Rincon

Intervention programs designed to improve undergraduate students’ participation and success in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields exist in colleges and universities throughout the United States. These programs seek to attract and retain traditionally underrepresented students including women and minorities through supplemental services including tutoring, mentoring, research, and social support networks. This study examines the extent to which such programs conduct evaluations of their program or services, and how evaluations impact the legitimacy of intervention programs. The results are discussed in terms of the legitimacy cycle and the PDSA cycle. Recommendations for STEM Intervention Programs, such as partnering with other departments and colleges to conduct evaluations, are offered.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

253. Ph.D. Program Offers New Opportunities in Engineering, Applied Sciences

by Osama Abudayyeh and Anthony Vizzini

Emerging engineering challenges and research questions of national and international stature are requiring an interdisciplinary approach to finding solutions. The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (CEAS) at Western Michigan University (WMU) currently offers five discipline-specific doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) programs that provide opportunities for faculty to work on research problems in classical fields of engineering. In this article, learn about the new Ph.D. program in the engineering and applied sciences (EAS) that provides the flexibility needed to address new and emerging interdisciplinary research areas that cut across several engineering and science disciplines. It also provides access to doctoral-level research activities to the 36% of our faculty in CEAS who did not have a mechanism to supervise Ph.D. students.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

254. SySTEMically Improving Student Academic Achievement in Mathematics and Science

by Kevin Mason, Jerrilyn Brewer, Jerry Redman, Charles Bomar, Petre Ghenciu , Mike LeDocq and Carolyn Chapel

The Western Wisconsin STEM Consortia project – SySTEMically Improving Student Academic Achievement in Mathematics and Science – provided professional development for 60 K-12 teachers from 9 different school districts in Western Wisconsin. The project was funded by a Math and Science Partnership Grant from the Wisconsin Department of Public of Instruction. The purpose of the project was to increase the academic achievement of students in mathematics and science by enhancing the content knowledge and teaching skills of classroom teachers. The 2010 Summer STEM Academy focused on ecosystems and the interdependence of organisms (Wisconsin Model Academic Standards F.12.7 and F.12.8), scientific inquiry (Wisconsin Model Academic Standard C), and statistics and probability (Common Core Standards S-CP and S-MD). It also addressed effective pedagogical strategies in mathematics and science, including contextual teaching, problem-based learning, project-based learning, and inquiry-based learning. The

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

255. From the Editor: Preparing Our Future Innovators

by Amanda Hankel

While teens believe some science, technology, engineering and technology (STEM)-related careers as offering the best chance of getting a job in the future, 67 percent of youth in grades 6-12 who are interested in pursuing a STEM career say they are concerned about the obstacles they would face, a recent ASQ survey reported. The survey was fielded online among 713 youth in grades 6-12 and a complementary survey was fielded online among 327 parents of children aged 10-17, in anticipation of National Engineers Week, Feb. 19-25. Meanwhile, ASQ has more than 14,000 member engineers who say they are concerned about ensuring a highly skilled workforce and educated engineers for the future. So what do these results mean? I think it means students want to pursue STEM-related careers, but question their preparedness to meet the demands of these fields.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

256. Guest Editorial: Reflections on Moving Forward on STEM Education

by Cindy P. Veenstra

The ASQ Education Division held a division conference last summer at the University of Wisconsin Stout that focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. The conference networked ideas to help students succeed and transition to STEM careers. From the 2011 conference, a book is being published of selected papers by 36 authors edited by the conference co-chairs, Julie Furst-Bowe, Fernando Padró and Cindy P. Veenstra. The book, Advancing the STEM Agenda: Quality Improvement Supports STEM, will be published by ASQ Quality Press in May. In this article, based on this experience, Veenstra offers her reflections on STEM education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-02
  • ASQ Higher Education
Open Access

257. ASQ Education Division's Strategic Plan on a Page

by Jay Marino

ASQ Education Division's Strategic Plan on a Page. This Plan defines the mission, vision, values & beliefs, goals and guiding philosophy of the division.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
  • ASQ.ORG
Open Access

258. QED News Announcement

call for articles..

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
Open Access

259. A New Tool to Uncover Curricular Shortcomings

by Bill Herman

Monona Grove School District has created a software tool, Ascent, to simplify measuring the academic progress of student groups. Using national growth norms as a reference point, Ascent enables quick comparison of the growth of student groups as selected by the user, so that data indicating weak group growth can be uncovered, underlying causes can be investigated, and curricular and instructional responses can be designed and implemented. The development of Ascent was funded by a federal ARRA grant. Ascent is licensed as open source and is freely available.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

260. Quality Counts: Report Issues Grades for Education Performance, Policy

by Amanda Hankel

The nation and many states face continuing challenges in delivering a high-quality education to all students, according to Quality Counts, the annual report card published by Education Week. The nation receives a C when graded across the six distinct areas of policy and performance tracked by the report, the most comprehensive ongoing assessment of the state of American education. For the fourth year in a row, Maryland earns honors as the top-ranked state, posting the nation’s highest overall grade, a B-plus. Perennial strong finishers Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia follow close behind, each receiving a B. Nearly half the states, however, receive grades of C or lower.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

261. Making Data Meaningful

by Amanda Hankel

With the idea of data-driven instruction—using data to shape curriculum—becoming increasingly expected of schools today, the ability to collect and interpret data is becoming more important than ever for primary and secondary education teachers. And from standardized test scores to student assessments and assignments, there is no shortage of data available. The problem is that with increasingly less time and fewer resources, teachers are facing difficulty in interpreting data in a way that is meaningful in making instructional decisions. In this month’s Primary and Secondary Education Brief, we focus on the topic “Moving Beyond Data Analysis to Data Interpretation and Use in Daily Instruction.” We take a look at how teachers can collect the right data that will be useful to them, and then interpret it in way that will be meaningful for guiding instruction.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

262. Using Data to Guide Instruction

by Amanda Hankel

To better use data at Cedar Rapids Community Schools, the district began using a process to analyze in-process/formative data to identify learner needs and inform instruction. The process is adapted from the Analyzing Student Work Template from the New Teacher Center at the University of California-Santa Cruz. Since piloting the process in select elementary schools in 2008 and moving to full implementation in all elementary schools in 2009, the district has seen tremendous growth. In 2011, third, fourth and fifth graders have made at least a year-and-a-half growth, according to a district data analysis using the National Grade Equivalency with the state's Iowa Test of Basic Skills for grades K-8.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2012-01
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

263. Systems Thinking: Critical to Quality Improvement in Higher Education

by Julie Furst-Bowe

Quality Approaches in Higher Education Vol. 2 (2) Dec 2011 article by Julie Furst-Bowe. For a successful approach to systems thinking, four components are needed: inclusive leadership, clearly defined set of student and stakeholders groups, a participatory planning process, and an end to end system for measuring institutional performance. These are discussed as they have pertained to the University of Wisconsin-Stout along with challenges for quality improvement in higher education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • Quality Approaches in Higher Education; Vol. 2; Issue 2
Open Access

264. STEM:An Entrepreneurial Approach

by Keith T. Miller

STEM: An Entrepreneurial Approach was the keynote address given by Dr. Keith T Miller, president of Virginia State University at the 2011 Advancing the STEM Agenda Conference. It was published in the Division's Quality Approaches in Higher Education Vol. 2 No. 2 (Nov. 2011). It discusses the need for STEM majors and how we must have the mind-set to educate one STEM student at a time. It describe a strategic plan for recruiting more STEM students to our universities and the importance of an entrepreneurial approach to exciting students about the STEM fields. We can improve the quality of our STEM education by adopting these approaches.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • Quality Approaches in Higher Education; Vol. 2; Issue 2
Open Access

265. Quality Approaches in Higher Education, Vol. 2 No. 2

by Deborah Hopen

Quality Approaches in Higher Education Vol.2 No.2 New Thinking New Results The articles in this issue include: Guest Commentary: Systems Thinking: Critical to Quality Improvement in Higher Education Julie Furst-Bowe STEM: An Entrepreneurial Approach Keith T. Miller Understanding Reliability in Higher Education Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Kenneth Royal Using Active, Cooperative Quality Exercises to Enhance Learning James A. Griesemer

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • Quality Approaches in Higher Education; Vol. 2; Issue 2

266. Understanding Reliability in Higher Education Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

by Royal, Kenneth;

Quality Approaches in Higher Education Vol. 2 (2) Dec 2011 article by Kenneth Royal. This article addresses some of the most common misconceptions about reliability in the higher education Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) arena and encourages practitioners to be more attentive to the details of calculating, interpreting, and reporting estimates of reliability. The article provides an overview of reliability and the factors that influence it, discusses the most commonly used types of reliability in SLO assessment, and provides guidance on how to effectively interpret and report such measures. The information presented should be particularly helpful to SLO practitioners who need a brief primer on reliability, ponder how to construct better assessment instruments, have an interest in making appropriate inferences about assessment results, and are concerned with reporting findings accurately and responsibly.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Education Division Web Site

267. Using Active, Cooperative Quality Exercises to Enhance Learning

by Griesemer, James A. ;

Quality Approaches in Higher Education Vol. 2 (2) Dec 2011 article by James A. Griesemer. Active, cooperative quality learning exercises were used to enhance learning in an undergraduate operations/supply chain management course. The quality tools and techniques supported course topics while also adding to students’ first-hand knowledge of quality management. Such exercises were found to improve students’ critical thinking and problem-solving skills significantly. Based on this early success, additional active, cooperative quality learning exercises are being developed for use in other business courses.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Education Division Web Site
Open Access

268. From the Editor: Quality Assessment

by Amanda Hankel

Accountability and assessment are common themes in the discussion about improving quality in higher education today, but ideas about how to practice assessment and encourage accountability are complex and diverse. Some educators speculate that accreditation provides one answer and attempt to examine its impact on quality. Others view the accreditation process as an enforced element that does not necessarily encourage the kind of “buy in” that leads to self-initiated continuous process improvement. These are the questions facing higher education institutions today, and the questions colleges and universities will continue to face as educators work to improve the quality of higher education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

269. Changes in the Higher Learning Commission Accreditation Requirements: An Overview

by Julie Furst-Bowe

The Higher Learning Commission is an independent corporation and one of two commission members of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA), one of six regional institutional accreditors. In 2009, the Higher Learning Commission began a comprehensive review of its traditional accreditation criteria. In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education required the Commission to define minimum expectations relative to each of the criteria. In the spring of 2011, an alpha version of the new criteria was made available along with the current minimum expectations within the criteria. Overall, although there are no significant changes in the nature of the accreditation requirements, the new documents provide greater clarity and direction for institutions and others involved in the accreditation process. The revised criteria should also lead to improvements in assessment, accountability and transparency.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

270. Using SIPOC to Define Your Research Agenda: A Tool for Junior Faculty

by Nicole Radziwill

For a tenure track faculty member, building a focused, goal directed program of research is a priority. However, it can be difficult to craft a cohesive strategy which will help a faculty member maintain his or her accountability to self, to the department, to the university, and to the community of researchers. Furthermore, describing the research agenda for the tenure package can be challenging. This article shows how to use suppliers, inputs, process, outputs, customers (SIPOC), a Six Sigma tool, to construct, refine and continuously improve a research agenda.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief
Open Access

271. Does Assessment Automatically Lead to Improvement?

by John Dew

Educators who study the quality sciences quickly encounter the concept of the Deming Cycle, created by W. Edwards Deming, as adapted to education: plan, do, study, act. The quality discipline teaches you how to properly collect and analyze data, and organize it to create and implement improvements, as well as address systemic issues within organizations that are vital for quality control and quality improvement. Proper analysis of data includes the understanding of common causes and special causes of variation in data.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-12
  • ASQ Higher Education Brief

272. 21st Century Learning through Continuous Improvement at the Agora School District

by Joyce de Vries; Rien Spies

This video describes the efforts by the Agora School District in the Netherlands to implement 21st Century learning through continuous improvement. Student-focused learning, such as students becoming independent learners, students leading conferences with parents and professional learning communities for teachers are shown.

  • Filetype: mp4
  • Publish date: 2011-11
Open Access

273. Effective Formative Assessment: Common Instructional Checks

by Mark Keen

In many classrooms in the United States, a vicious cycle occurs daily that goes like this: Students are presented material and tested on that material, and then are presented new material and tested on the new material. And the cycle continues. Students soon learn how to “play school,” meaning to study for short-term memory results, take the test, drop that material from the mind and repeat the same mental process for the new material. Thus, they get good grades but do not really learn. Given this background and our school district’s mission to “provide meaningful and engaging work in the pursuit of profound learning” (“profound” meaning learned in one situation and able to be applied in a different situation), we set off to develop a process to overcome the practice of “playing school” and truly pursue profound learning. To begin, the leadership design team, made up of the district’s principals and central office administrators, set out to develop a process that addressed t

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

274. LEADing Your School to a Quality Future

by Amanda Hankel

When it comes to implementing quality and continuous improvement in K-12 schools, leadership is essential. That was the message in a recent presentation at the National Quality in Education Conference (NQEC) on building a quality culture in your school. According to Tami Miller, one of the presenters and leadership development coordinator for the Greenville Chamber of Commerce in Greenville, SC, leadership is often the missing component in a school’s implementation of quality. Miller is a former school teacher who has spent the last four years of her career managing the Greenville Chamber of Commerce’s Center for Excellence, which provides professional development to area schools on the fundamentals of quality and continuous improvement. “We know leadership is a missing factor for a lot of schools,” Miller said. “If the leadership is not solid, the implementation will only go so far.” Brenda Byrd, principal at Bethel Elementary School in Greenville, SC, for six years, presented w

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief
Open Access

275. Accountability Is Key

by Amanda Hankel

In this issue of the Primary and Secondary Education Brief, one of the interviews I conducted was with Lee Jenkins, an educational consultant and owner of LtoJ Consulting. After speaking with Jenkins, I felt the topic of our conversation highlighted perfectly the continual theme I found throughout this issue focused on facilitating instructional improvement with quality models—more specifically, accountability. Who is accountable for ensuring students receive a quality education, that students have a quality learning environment, and that the teachers educating our students are “quality”? It’s not as cut-and-dry as it seems, and it may be behind some of today’s struggles in quality in education.

  • Filetype: pdf
  • Publish date: 2011-11
  • ASQ Primary and Secondary Education Brief

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