March Roundup: What To Do About STEM Education?

How are your math skills? If you’re reading this, you probably work in quality, engineering, or a related field, and chances are your math is pretty good. This is not the case for a lot of students—especially, it seems, in the United States. This was the topic for discussion for ASQ’s Influential Voices bloggers in March, inspired by ASQ CEO Bill Troy’s post about ways to encourage business owners to support STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

Tim McMahon writes that STEM is in crisis—an offers several few ideas that can help, including becoming a mentor.  Rajan Thiyagarajan also shares his tips to improve STEM, which range from brushing up on STEM basics to exploring gamification. Sunil Kaushik also suggests brushing up on both fundamentals and fun

Speaking of fun, Don Brecken wonders if we should add a lot more of it to STEM education. Nicole Radziwill suggests and defines STEAM as the solution (STEM plus the arts). Jennifer Stepniowski suggests some unique ways to promote STEM to kids, including volunteering at schools.

Scott Rutherford asks if we’re truly promoting STEM in innovating ways. John Hunter argues that we need to improve STEM education to increase interest in the field. Cesar Diaz Guevara writes that engineering should be synonymous with inventiveness.

Pam Schodt offers some practical tips for teenagers in choosing a STEM career. Luciana Paulisa writes that the key is making STEM fit students’ intrinsic needs.

Jimena Calfa writes about the state of STEM in Argentina, while Lotto Lai reports about STEM education in Hong Kong. Manu Vora blogs about STEM education and competitiveness in India.

Edwin Garro reflects on the success of STEM in Costa Rica, including the success stories in his own family. Dan Zrymiak writes about promoting STEM in Canada, and Michael Noble looks at the causes of a possible STEM shortage in North America. Finally,  Anshuman Tiwari describes two young STEM students who would make great role models for students in India.

Encourage the Next Generation of STEM Professionals

A version of this blog post was originally published by www.biztimes.com.

We all know how important it is to get students interested in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and math. But we also know that STEM doesn’t always have the best reputation among teens—with perceptions ranging from science being “hard” or boring. And yet, the news is not all bad.

Case in point. Every year ASQ surveys teenagers about various STEM topics. In our 2015 survey, 80 percent of teens said they admire engineers’ problem-solving abilities and 68 percent think engineers get paid a high salary. Only 38 percent, however, think that engineers can easily get a job.

To us at ASQ, the survey underscores that teens have at least some interest in STEM, but worry about the job market. Are their fears unwarranted? According to various sources, the U.S. may have a STEM skills shortage, and many such jobs are going unfilled. You can read more about the state of STEM jobs in the U.S. News and World Report and The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI survey.

(And by the way, if you’re based outside of the U.S., I’m interested in the state of STEM in your country–are young people pursuing this field? Why or why not?)

So, what to do about this problem?  Note that unfilled STEM jobs slow down business growth, lower productivity, and lead to lower revenues–whether you’re a STEM business/employee or not. (Source is this infographic.) In ASQ’s 2014 Engineering Week survey, we asked our members to give engineering students some advice. I believe their advice is applicable nearly worldwide, and is also helpful to businesses that may be employing  students as interns or staff.

Be a mentor. Consider becoming a mentor, formally or informally.  For students, the “the best way to learn about leadership is by seeing it demonstrated in real life, not out of a book.”

Build relationships. Do you have a relationship with a local school, university, or STEM program? This can be a source of potential future interns, apprentices, and employees.

Consider STEM-related sponsorships. For example, a local doctor’s office might support students with a sponsorship to a Science Olympiad team or a small manufacturer might partner with students who are participating in a robotics club. You could also look into opportunities to speak about your own STEM-related field during career days at school.

Provide a business education. Students who go into STEM benefit from understanding business basics and how to communicate with the C-suite. Even if your business is not in the STEM field, any potential science student will gain from your knowledge and experience.

Educate yourself as a parent. Frequently, parents with no background in STEM fields are not aware of the opportunities in those areas, and consequently do not educate their kids in the vast career opportunities available. If your child shows interest in math or science, it’s time to read up on the different career paths available. Does your child want to be a mechanical or civil engineer? What about a career in nanotechnology, biomechanics, or astrophysics?  There are so many choices available and you should start educating yourself so that you can have informed conversations with your children.

Businesses can play an important role in helping to encourage the next generation of STEM professionals. It’s time to step up to the plate.