Top 10 Books for Those New to Quality

Which books are most useful to those just starting out in quality?

Being new to the quality field can be overwhelming, but you can get up-to-speed by reading the essentials.

Add your essentials to the comments!

1. The Quality Toolbox, Second Edition by Nancy R. Tague
The Quality Toolbox is a comprehensive reference to a variety of methods and techniques: those most commonly used for quality improvement, many less commonly used, and some created by the author and not available elsewhere.
The book is written and organized to be as simple as possible to use so that anyone can find and learn new tools without a teacher. Above all, this is an instruction book. The reader can learn new tools or, for familiar tools, discover new variations or applications. It also is a reference book, organized so that a half-remembered tool can be found and reviewed easily, and the right tool to solve a particular problem or achieve a specific goal can be quickly identified.

2. The ASQ Quality Improvement Pocket Guide: Basic History, Concepts, Tools, and Relationships edited by Grace L. Duffy
This pocket guide is designed to be a quick, on-the-job reference for anyone interested in making their workplace more effective and efficient. It will provide a solid initial overview of what “quality” is and how it could impact you and your organization. Use it to compare how you and your organization are doing things, and to see whether what’s described in the guide might be useful.

3. The ASQ Pocket Guide to Root Cause Analysis by Bjørn Andersen and Tom Natland Fagerhaug
The purpose of this pocket guide is to provide you with easily accessible knowledge about the art of problem solving, with a specific focus on identifying and eliminating root causes of problems.

4. Process Improvement Simplified: A How-to Book for Success in any Organization by James B. King, Francis G. King , and Michael W. R. Davis
This book reveals the secrets of Process Improvement (PI). For any organization, this book defines a process as the interaction of people, methods, materials, equipment, measurement and the environment to perform a task or produce an output.

5.The Certified Quality Improvement Associate Handbook, Third Edition: Basic Quality Principles and Practices edited by Russell T. Westcott and Grace L. Duffy
ASQ’s Certified Quality Improvement Associate (CQIA) certification is designed to introduce the basics of quality to organizations and individuals not currently working within the field of quality. This book and the Body of Knowledge (BOK) it supports are intended to form a foundation for further study and application of proven quality principles and practices worldwide.

6. Performance Metrics: The Levers for Process Management by Duke Okes
This book provides a clarifying perspective for those who know that metrics need to be developed but are unsure as to the steps to follow in developing and deploying them. It focuses on making sure that the metrics selected will guide people and processes in the direction the organization wants to go, and allow continual evaluation of success.

7. The Memory Jogger 2, Second Edition: A Pocket Guide of Tools for Continuous Improvement and Effective Planning by Michael Brassard and Diane Ritter
Critical tools are explained using real-life examples from all types of organizations with problems similar to yours, making them easy for everyone to understand and apply. The Memory Jogger 2, Second Edition contains all the tools found in the first edition of the Memory Jogger 2, plus 50 pages of new charts and detailed diagram samples, a new tool, and a case study.

8. The Essential Deming: Leadership Principles from the Father of Quality by Joyce Nilsson Orsini PhD.
The book is filled with articles, papers, lectures, and notes touching on a wide range of topics, but which focus on Deming’s overriding message: quality and operations are all about systems, not individual performance; the system has to be designed so that the worker can perform well.

9. Principles of Quality Costs, Fourth Edition: Financial Measures for Strategic Implementation of Quality Management edited by Douglas C. Wood
The purpose of this book remains the same as the third edition: to provide a basic understanding of the principles of quality cost. Using this book, organizations can develop and implement a quality cost system to fit their needs. Used as an adjunct to overall financial management, these principles will help maintain vital quality improvement programs over extended timeframes.

10. Outcomes, Performance, Structure: Three Keys to Organizational Excellence by Michael E. Gallery and Stephen C. Carey
The purpose of this book is to help you put already-existing performance criteria in a context of your organizational system and assist you in using the criteria to assess problems in your organization. More importantly, this book will help you in designing systemic solutions to the systemic problems you have identified with easy-to-use samples and questions that draw out key areas where the organization needs to improve.

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6 Responses to Top 10 Books for Those New to Quality

  1. Eimantas says:

    I have found Juran’s Quality handbook: Complete guide to performance excelence to be very usefull.

    Eimantas

  2. Matt LeVeque says:

    Juran’s Quality Handbook is a must, but pretty heavy for someone new to quality. For someone new to quality I would highly recommend starting with John Guspari’s trilogy:

    I Know It When I See It: A Modern Fable About Quality
    The Theory Why: In Which the Boss Solves the Riddle of Quality
    It’s About Time: A Fable About the Next Dimension of Quality

    Although the first book is ~30 years old, it’s still relevant today.

  3. Joe Raasch says:

    New to Quality? Read a book about how to solve business problems and implement solutions. Quality is a tool, not an end in itself.

    Book rec: “Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done” – Bossidy/Charan.

  4. Abdullah Dhafer says:

    Juran’s book is one of the best, in addition I would recommend the Memory Jogger

  5. Frank Benarth says:

    Agree with both comments above, in particular the reference to I Know It When I See It…

  6. Meri says:

    Particularly informative….looking frontward to coming back again.|

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