Top 11 Insights From ASQ’s Future of Quality Study

Every three years, ASQ publishes a study on the future of quality. The 2015 edition, which you can read here, is unusual in that it’s a compilation of essays mostly from experts outside the field of quality.

Unlike previous editions of the research, most of the topics are not about quality exactly, but rather about fields that will impact quality directly and indirectly in the next decade. The topics range from city planning to global aerospace and defense, to the Internet.

In this post we’ve compiled the “key” insights from each of the 11 essays in the Future of Quality research. Interested in reading more? Remember, you can access the entire complication at the Future of Quality site.

Adaptable leaders must be rewarded on attributes like self-awareness and constant
learning, not only on meeting a sales quota or exceeding a revenue target.

Stanley McChrystal and Rodney Evans, from “The Future of Leadership: From Efficiency To Adaptability.”

Unlike the proprietary counterparts that it soon eclipsed, the Internet has no main menu, no CEO, and no business plan. Anything could be built on top of it without permission of a central authority… To see the multidimensionality of quality in the information space is to understand the breathtaking array of choices and trade offs.

Jonathan Zittrain, from “The Future of the Internet: Balancing Security With Openness in the Internet of Things.”

We must also use quality and continuous improvement to eliminate design features or flaws that can be exploited….Interconnectedness…increases the need for quality at the component and the system level, so that errors and failures are eliminated before their effects propagate through the system.”

Stephen Rosen, from “The Future of Global Aerospace and Defense: Implications of International Trends for Quality.”

(Smart manufacturing) and the roles for new IT capabilities in a manufacturing enterprise must grow from the interoperation of physical, cyber, and workforce elements… Can enterprise performance with new IT be predicted so that entry points for smart manufacturing systems can be identified?

Jim Davis, from “The Future of Manufacturing: Briding Seams and Transactions to Integrate Next-Generation Information Technology.”

Quality concepts and the spirit of continuous improvement will be crucial to consolidating a new culture of public administration.

Izabel Christina Cotta Matte, from “The Future of Cities: Quality, Planning, and Excellence in Public Sector Management.”

“The advent of digital technology, big data, and customization will impact education at all levels and of all types…In the future we will have more data about student learning than ever before, and we will have better systems to help us analyze it.”

JoAnn Sternke, from “The Future of Education: Quality Teachers for the 21st Century.”

The nature of energy will be shifting from being focused on acquiring and distributing commodity resources to being centered on knowledge-driven and technology-based renewable energy…In the future, buildings will be hubs of energy production and storage as well as consumption.

Zheng Mingguang, from “The Future of Energy: Long-Term Trends and Global Implications.”

As the customers’ experience with the product or service develops over time, so they will tend to develop trust and confidence with the brand, provided their experience is positive…Customers don’t know what they need, and different customers perceive their needs based upon their unique psychological experiments.

Gregory and Andrew Watson, from “The Future of Customer Experience (CEx): CEx Becomes the Dominant Design Force Influencing Markets.”

The good news is that large, complex, unstructured problems are exactly the type of
problems that the statistical engineering approach was designed to handle.

Ronald Snee and Roger Hoerl, “The Future of Quality: Getting Better All the Time.”

In the highly competitive future environment emerging in the global market, there is a need to develop a concept of quality for sales that has to be practiced in addition to quality for cost.

Noriaki Kano, from “The Future of Quality: Toward Quality for Sales in Addition to Quality for Cost Through Enhancement of Customer Satisfaction.”

Less than 15 to 20 percent of the world’s population can afford any of the surgeries of the heart, brain, joint replacement, or those standard in cancer treatment…Scaling health access more broadly moving forward will require rethinking business models and similarly expanding and efficiently utilizing pools of resources.

Devi Shetty, from “The Future of Healthcare: Toward a Global Medical Universe.”

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