What Motivates Your Career?

What are your professional New Year’s resolutions? It might be all too common to set resolutions, and yet it I think it’s helpful to set goals to accomplish in coming year. So it’s appropriate that late last year we were talking about salaries: specifically, ASQ’s 2012 salary outlook survey for quality professionals. In short: times are tough, and for the first time ever the survey showed that salaries in the quality field stayed flat.

ASQ’s Influential Voices reflected on what it takes to get a raise these days and show the value of quality in the workplace. Are you looking to make your case for a raise in 2013? If so, some recommended reading is below.

Several bloggers, including Tim McMahon, chose to first define personal success and goals. In fact, goal setting is #1 on David Levy’s list. Assess your capabilities and skills, added Jennifer Stepniowski. Daniel Zrymiak suggested starting with 5 P’s—the first of which is perspective—what’s your environment like?

And speaking of perspective, Cesar Diaz Guevara made the provocative argument that we are paid what we are worth. Similarly, Guy Wallace wrote that “if you are not adding value, you’re subtracting value.” How can we add more value?

Robert Mitchell explored the meaning of value in a large corporation, as did Rajan Thiyagarajan. Key argument: Stay dynamic and agile. Delivering on goals is still key, wrote Anshuman Tiwari, since quality is no longer restricted to purely quality professionals

Once you have some perspective and have set your goals, pick a strategy. Dr. Lotto Lai wrote about different strategies that he believes are helpful when first starting out (training, certification), versus mid-career (promotion). Jimena Calfa and Nergis Soylemez blogged about the importance of certifications in tough times. Try to boost your team—not just yourself, added John Priebe.

What if you can’t get a raise due to your work environment and situation? Scott Rutherford offered some advice. Look for creative ways to give yourself a raise, wrote Don Brecken.

Finally, regardless of the times, keep in mind it’s never easy to get a raise, said Dr. Robert Burney. Dr. Michael Noble agreed, and advised us to look for our organization’s weakest point. How can quality help?

In the end we all realize the role money plays in our lives, and most agree that a great job – one where you are respected, supported to grow into your full potential, and given the opportunity to make a difference – is more important that being paid more for a job you don’t enjoy.  Sometimes the greenest grass is not on the other side of the fence, but we don’t realize that until we’ve climbed over the fence.  Make sure you know what motivates you.

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2 Responses to What Motivates Your Career?

  1. What should you pay a book writer to have your book written? This is where your own personal perception of value comes into play. And as long as you stay away from the lowball pricing game being played by the non-professionals, which are in multitude, you will do fine in achieving your lifelong dream by having a quality book that you can be proud of, one that the world is willing to embrace.

  2. Robert Mitchell explored the meaning of value in a large corporation , as did Rajan Thiyagarajan. Key argument: Stay dynamic and agile . Delivering on goals is still key, wrote Anshuman Tiwari, since quality is no longer restricted to purely quality professionals .

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